Posts in Smartphones
Would your kids leave their smartphone at home during a family vacation?

I just got back from a 3-week vacation with Meleah, my 13-year-old. She is a social teen who likes to “talk” to her friends via Snapchat, Facetime, and Instagram frequently.  A week before we left she said: “Mom, I think I’m going to leave my iPhone at home.”  I played it cool and just asked why. She said she needed a break. So, we went old school and turned it back to 2004. 

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Do you know the cell phone policy at your child's school?

When I visit schools across the country, I am consistently surprised that students, parents and even teachers are frequently unsure of the cell phone policies at their school. Wouldn't it be great if we had data on how often middle schools allow students to have cell phones with them all day? And wouldn’t it be great if we knew what policies parents want?

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4 rules for managing tech time

Families today are busy. Often everyone is running in different directions, and texting each other under the same roof is becoming the new normal. This disconnect in personal touch is troublesome.  To keep our sanity, and our face-to-face conversations alive, my family follows four rules...

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Kids think they are better multitaskers, but are they?

I am the first to say that I love multitasking. We know the brain can handle certain kinds of tasks at the same time like walking and chewing gum because those actions don’t rely too much on the frontal cortex. However, our brains can't adequately process the performance of two tasks at the same time when those tasks require some thinking.

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Do you have physical effects from screen overuse?

People often ask me about the medical risks that all this screen time is having on our kids—such as the development of eyesight problems or tendonitis. I get emails from ophthalmologists who are convinced that nearsightedness is increasing, but so far there are no long-term studies to say anything definitively.

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Does device checking cause anxiety?

The American Psychologic Association (APA) just released a report that found that almost 90% of adults in the U.S. say that they either often check or constantly check their emails, texts, and social media accounts. This group reported higher anxiety levels than those who do not check constantly.

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Unplugging for 1 day... why it can be a good

The 24 hours from sundown March 3rd until sundown March 4th, 2017 is The National Day of Unplugging. This day is designed to help people of all ages to embrace the ancient ritual of a day of rest and we are so excited that Screenagers is a co-sponsor! 

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Have you or your teen ever been "ghosted?"

Have you ever heard the term “ghosting”? It happens to teens and adults alike and according to a Huffington Post poll, about 10 percent of Americans have "ghosted" someone to break up with them. Using avoidance as a coping skill is not new, but online communication has made that an easier way to deal with uncomfortable situations.

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Mental health issues on social media, who is talking?

My own two teens both have rich emotional lives—full of ups and downs (like most of us on this planet). From this I realized I wanted to talk more with them about how they and their friends communicate on social media and via text about their mental health. What do they find helpful and what is not helpful?

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Family gatherings: Face-to-face or face-to-screen?

How comfortable are your kids talking to extended family and adult friends? One concern I often hear from parents is that they think screen time decreases face-to-face communication skills. I have not found any exceptional data around this issue. Families and friends will be together for the holidays and in these settings many kids and adults will gravitate towards their personal devices. When situations are uncomfortable or activity is slowed down this is accepted behavior these days. It upsets me when I see kids disappear into their screens when those special multigenerational opportunities for conversation are right in front of them.

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